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Strathcona (Vancouver, B.C.) City planning--Urban renewal--Strathcona (Vancouver, B.C.)
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The Strathcona porch project

Item is a documentary film about the neighbourhood of Strathcona, its history, and a project to promote the beautification/renovation of many of the front porches of the neighbourhood.

The film is divided into four sections. The first section (The Strathcona neighbourhood) is a history of the neighbourhood, and discusses a twenty year renovation ban and the effects it had on the community. It includes footage of many Strathcona houses and porches before the renovations, street scenes of Chinatown and the general neighbourhood, Strathcona community garden, Strathcona School, local community centre, Buddhist temple, East Pender Street, the Strathcona Ukrainian Hall, Hawks Avenue, Keefer Street, and East Georgia Street. The second section (History and process) is a history of the Porch project and an explanation of how it works. It includes an interview with Nora Kelly, from the Strathcona Residents Association, in which she discusses the history of the project, and a short clip from the news program Chinatown Today (1994-04-24). The third section (Getting down to work) is a review of the project results. It discusses the conditions for selecting houses appropriate for the project, how the funding worked, and the execution of the renovations. These subjects are illustrated with footage of porches before renovation, during demolition, and during the renovation process. It also includes interviews about the renovation with homeowner Paul Burke, Judy Oberlander (Porch Project Heritage Planner), and several unnamed contractors. The fourth section (Results) discusses the outcomes of the renovation efforts. It includes footage of completed porch restorations and an interview with Paul Burke about the effect of the restoration on his home.

Steve Rosell, special asst. to Robert Andras, 1970-1972 [interview]

Item part is a recording of Steve Rosell, who served as special assistant to Canadian politician Robert Andras from 1970 to 1972, as he responds to written questions about the Strathcona Property Owners and Tenants Association, urban planning, policies, and the surrounding politics. The opening of the tape contains clips from "You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown" (Clark Gesner); Steve Rosell begins addressing questions at the 6 min., 25 sec. mark as classical music plays in the background. After Rosell finishes with the questions, the song "The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin' Groovy)" (Simon & Garfunkel) plays. From the 37 min., 57 sec. mark to the end of the tape is silent.

Ron Basford; King Ganong [interviews]

Item part is a recording of interviews with former MLA Ron Basford and King Ganong. Ron Basford speaks about zoning and funding considerations in attempting to renew Strathcona, and King Ganong speaks about negotiations with SPOTA and the City of Vancouver to secure funding for the renewal of properties within Strathcona. Interview cuts out at end of tape.

John Coates, Planning Dept.; Lloyd Axeworthy, E.A. to Paul Hellyer [interviews]

Item part is a recording of interviews with John Coates of the Planning Department and Lloyd Axeworthy, then executive assistant to Paul Hellyer of the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), about the joint Strathcona-CMHC initiatives to renew housing in the area, as well as the associated history and politics. Interview cuts out at end of tape.

East End project area

Item shows building types and proposed layout of buildings and streets in Strathcona as part of the 1957 Vancouver Redevelopment Study.

Dan Coates, ex-asst to Robert Andras 1968-1973 [interview]

Item is a recording of an interview with Dan Coates, who served as an executive assistant to Canadian politician Robert Andras from 1960 to 1973. The discussion touches on Robert Andras' view on urban renewal and planning, the general view of urban renewal at the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), and the desire to include the Strathcona community in the discussion of planning in the area.