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Shwu-Hoang Po Hing - late 1930s

Collector/curator's description reads: “Late 1930s, Vancouver. Photo of Shwu-hoang Po Hing, an actress. This photo was found in the collection of Louis Gain Wai, a Vancouver Chinatown businessman who owned The Chung King Restaurant and was a big supporter of the arts. He had several photos of this actress in his files, including one photo that he took with the entertainer.”

Shwu-Hoang Po Hing - portrait

Collector/curator's description reads: “1940s, Vancouver. Portrait of Shwu-Hoang Po Hing, an actress. This photo was found in the collection of Louis Gain Wai, a businessman in Vancouver's Chinatown who owned the Chung King restaurant on East Pender Street. He was a big supporter of the arts, and in his collection are several photos of this actress.”

Unidentified Chinese actor - 1940s

Collector/curator's description reads: “1940s, Vancouver. Unidentified Chinese man, likely an actor. The photo was found in the collection of Louis Gain Wai, a Vancouver Chinatown businessman who owned The Chung King Restaurant and was a big supporter of the arts.”

Chinese Fairgrounds opening - March 24, 1928

Collector/curator's description reads: “1928, Vancouver. Won Alexander Cumyow (left) and Vancouver Mayor L.D. Taylor at the grand opening of the Chinatown fairgrounds. In Paul Yee's book [Saltwater City], a slightly different version of this photo is accompanied by the caption ‘Opening of the Chinese Playground, 1928, behind the southeast corner of Pender and Carrall Streets. Standing by the stage is Won Alexander Cumyow, and on stage is Mayor L.D. Taylor.’ The banner lists, in Chinese, the schedule/line-up for the opening ceremony: ‘Grand Opening Line-Up; Group gather; Students play army song; unveiling; President speech; Vancouver Mayor Speech; Sing China National Anthem; Take Photo; Student Parade Proclaim 3 times, "Long Live the Republic of China"; Awards/Memorabilia "gold plaque"; Pass out Candies; End of Ceremony.’

Vancouver Jubilee - 1936 - Shirley Temple in crowd

Collector/curator's description reads: “1936, Vancouver. Photo of child actress Shirley Temple attending the Chinatown exhibition. The exhibition was part of Vancouver's Golden Jubilee celebrations. Temple is flanked by two White men in uniform (likely police constables), a White woman. In the background we can see Wong Foon Sein (aka head of the Chinese Benevolent Association and dubbed the Mayor of Chinatown).”

Vancouver Jubilee - 1936 - Shirley Temple meets Chinese Acrobat

Collector/curator's description reads: “1936, Vancouver. Photo of child actress Shirley Temple attending the Chinatown exhibition. The exhibition was part of Vancouver's Golden Jubilee celebrations. Temple is shaking hands with a young Chinese boy dressed in a silk costume whose stage name was ‘The Little Acrobat.’ Other young Chinese people, dressed in costume are on stage as well as an older man.”

Choy - Toy family

Collector/curator's description reads: “Vancouver, 1939. Toy and Lily Choy with the newly-adopted son, Wayson. They were an older couple unable to have children. Toy was a cook with CPR ships, while Lily worked in a sausage shop in Chinatown. Years later, their son Wayson would become a celebrated Asian-Canadian writer who would author popular stories of growing up in Chinatown, including ‘The Jade Peony’ and ‘Paper Shadows.’ Only at age 56 did Wayson learn he was adopted and that his biological father had been a member of a Cantonese opera company.”

Goon Ling Dang w wife and Betty - 1920

Collector/curator's description reads: “1920s, Vancouver. Photograph of businessman Goon Ling Dang, his wife Wong Shee and Betty Goon. Goong Ling Dang was a respected and influential businessman in Vancouver's Chinatown. When he passed away, even the English newspapers covered his passing. Betty Goon was not the daughter of Goon Ling Dang, but she was related in some way: a Goon from the same village in China. Betty originally was slated to be a maid to the wealthy Goon Ling Dang family, who over the years had of number of ‘mui tsai’ (child servants) working in their house. However Betty became a permanent playmate/friend to Pearl Goon, one of the patriarch's daughters. She was considered family and was included in every family function. ‘Mui tsai’ (which means ‘little sister’) were female child servants who [were] adopted and worked in the homes of wealth[y] Chinese. The girls often came from impoverished families. The promise made to the birth family was that as the girl came of marriageable age, the adopting family would arrange for her to be married.”

Goon Wong Shee w U.S. relatives

Collector/curator's description reads: “1922, Vancouver. A pregnant Wong Shee Goon (far right) sits with two women from Portland, Oregon who were visiting Vancouver: Jin How (far left) and an unidentified woman with the surname How. Wong Shee was the second wife of Chinatown businessman Goon Ling Dang. The two How women were relatives of Goon Ling Dang's first wife, who had died. The two women came to visit their former brother-in-law and meet his new, second wife and this photo was taken. Wong Shee was born and raised in China, and was significantly younger than her husband.”

Lai - Wing and son Tin Yew

Collector/curator's description reads: “1940s, Vancouver. Studio photo of a father and son: Lai Wing (left) and Lai Tin Yew. Wing worked on the railroad and later opened a barber shop in Chinatown. His son, Tin Yew, worked in sawmills and then ran Yip Hong Yuen bakery in Chinatown until his retirement.”

Lai family - 1928

Collector/curator's description reads: “1928, Vancouver. The Lai Family. The names of the individuals are no longer remembered. However, the older woman in the photo was once a child house servant to Vancouver Chinatown businessman Goon Ling Dang. When she came of age, the Goon family arranged for her to be married. She married the oldest gentleman in this photo, whose surname is Lai, and they moved to Barkville [Barkerville?]. This photo would have been taken during a visit to Vancouver and likely given as a gift to the Goon Ling Dang family as it was found in their family archives.”

Lim - But Sun family - early 1930s

Collector/curator's description reads: “Early 1930s, Vancouver. Photo of the Lim Butt Sun Family. Lim Butt Sun owned a herbal store called Kwong Chai Tong which was located at 92 East Pender St. He is shown here with his Canadian family, and superimposed is his first wife and children. Back Row Standing (left to right): Don Lim (May 26, 1925 - May 21, 2014). Became a family physician and opthamologist in Kelowna BC. Fannie Lim (November 22, 1913 - August 30, 1967). She would later marry Shong Butt Chong. On Lim (January 27, 1924 - June 4, 2007). He worked as a civil engineer in BC. Front Row (left to right):- Lily Lim (August 18, 1927 - ). Lives in San Francisco and married a Chung. Mrs. Frank Lim (wife that lived in China. She is superimposed into this photo.). Ning Lim (June 18, 1930 - September 6, 2018) (Frank's son likely born and living in China?). Mrs. Lim Butt Sun (February 12, 1889 - January 12, 1971). Bob Lim (September 18, 1929 - ). He worked as a Pharmacist in Burnaby BC. Lim Butt Sun (October 1889 - October 16, 1950). Walter Lim (March 27, 1926 - April 12, 2017). He operated the Gold Yuan Restaurant on Pender St, in Vancouver's Chinatown. Frank Lim (1910-January 11, 1998). He was the eldest son of Lim Butt Sun and continued the family business of Kwong Chai Tong until 1971. Frank's daughter. First name unknown and living in China. She is superimposed into the photo.”

Mah - Moon Yuen family

Collector/curator's description reads: “Circa 1922, Vancouver. Photo of the Mah family. Mah Moon Yuen (1878-1943), with his wife Lee Lin Choy (1897-1993) and their adopted children Robert Sing Mah (1921-1981) and Adeline Mah (later Wong). Both children had been adopted and were believed to be of mixed race: Chinese and Aboriginal. Yuen, who is quite thin, worked in a sawmill and the family stories say he would walk each day from Chinatown to his job in New Westminster. Lee Lin Choy was purchased at the age of 8 as a maid for a wealthy family. Subsequently, the family immigrated and lived in Victoria BC. Eventually a marriage was arranged for her to a man who was 20 years her senior (my grandfather in the photo). He died (about) 1942 and Poh was a widow for 50 years. She adopted these two children with him.”

McFadden - James and family

Collector/curator's description reads: “Circa 1937, Vancouver. Colourized family photo of (left to right): James Holiday McFadden; Vera (Taylor) McFadden and Charles Angus McFadden (born 1928). James had arrived from Virginia in 1927 and worked with the CPR as a porter. Vera's family had come to Nova Scotia, Canada via the Underground Railroad. The family lived for several years near Main and 5th. A favourite outing was a trip to Chinatown for a meal. The Hong Kong Cafe was a favourite diner.”

Nazell family 1945

Collector/curator's description reads: “1945, Vancouver. Maj-Britt Nazell (20) with her parents, Samuel and Christina Nazell. The family immigrated from Sweden in 1927 after a fire destroyed their farm. Maj-Britt recalls this was her favourite dress and she bought it on a lay-away plan, as she did with most of her clothing at that time. The dress was, grey, as shown in this photo. However, in an identical hand-painted photo, the dress tinted blue which helps Maj-Britt stand out in a rather monochromatic photo. During the war, Maj-Britt found herself frequently in Chinatown after a party or dance, enjoying Chinese food at WK Gardens until the wee hours of the morning. ‘It was an adventure.’ Her father ran a rooming house on East Hastings.”

Nazell - 1945

Collector/curator's description reads: “1945, Vancouver. Maj-Britt Nazell (20) with her parents, Samuel and Christina Nazell. The family immigrated from Sweden in 1927 after a fire destroyed their farm. Maj-Britt recalls this was her favourite dress and she bought it on a lay-away plan, as she did with most of her clothing at that time. The dress was, in fact, grey. And in an identical hand-painted photo, the dress is grey. However, in this image, the dress has been tinted blue and helps the attractive young woman to stand out in what is otherwise a monochromatic photo. During the war, Maj-Britt found herself frequently in Chinatown after a party or dance, enjoying Chinese food at WK Gardens until the wee hours of the morning. ‘It was an adventure.’ Her father ran a rooming house on East Hastings.”

Quan - Shoong Wing and sons - c. 1935

Collector/curator's description reads: “Circa 1935, Vancouver. Photo Quan Shoong Wing (seated centre) and his two sons. (Left to right): Quan Sew Gai (aka Robert Quan); Quan Shoong Wing (seated centre); and Quan Sew Guey (also known as Arthur Quan) who was the son of Shoong Wing. Quan Shoong Wing was a prominent figure in Chinatown and in the Chinese Benevolent Association until his death. He was a partner in various Chinatown enterprises and owned the West End block building where he allowed his son Arthur and his family to live in a modest suite. Later in life, Shoong Wing ran a grocery store on the corner of the West End block. Apparently, Arthur was adopted having been born in China to an actress in a Shanghai Opera troupe.”

Tremblay - family - 1940s

Collector/curator's description reads: “Circa 1942-43, Vancouver. Photo of the Tremblay family. Parents Fred & Emma are seated, with their 5 children standing. Fred & Emma Tremblay (seated) are pictured with their five children (L-R) Art, George, Freddie, Blanche and Bernie. Fred & Emma, both of French descent, immigrated to Vancouver from North Dakota (via Saskatchewan) in the late 1920s. Upon arrival, Fred opened Vancouver Auto Clinic on Keefer Street in Chinatown with his brother Alec. This is where Fred must have known Yucho Chow, as this family portrait was taken several years after Fred opened his solo business, Tremblay Motors, in Kitsilano in 1934. Fred, nicknamed Chief, later enlisted his four sons into the family business and renamed it Tremblay & Sons Motors (also the oldest Chevron dealership in Canada). Many Vancouverites passed through the garage doors and drove up to the gas pumps at Tremblay's on the corner of 4th & MacDonald, where it proudly stood until 1993. Unfortunately, the last member in this family portrait passed away in 2013. However, many of Fred & Emma's grandchildren, great grandchildren, and now great great grandchildren still call the Lower Mainland home. Photo Courtesy of Linda Tremblay, whose father Bernard (1931-2001) is pictured far right.”

Weinstein - Miriam with daughters - 1934

Collector/curator's description reads: “1934, Vancouver. Postcard photo of Mrs. Miriam Weinstein and her two Canadian-born daughters: Lily (left) aged 3 and Esther, aged 4. The family were Romanian-Jewish immigrants that lived for a time in the Chinatown/Strathcona neighbourhood. Although Jewish, the two young girls attended a Christian kindergarten in a nearby church. There they learned a number of favourite Christian children songs like "Jesus Loves Me" which they would sing at home much to the consternation of their mother.”

Wong - Kung Lai - 1932

Collector/curator's description reads: “1932, Vancouver (23 W Pender). Photo of the Modernize Tailor family. L to R: Mother Man Ming (nee Chu); Anna (on lap); Jack; Father Kung Lai Wong; Helen; Bill; Unknown relative; Allan. Kung Lai Wong arrived in Vancouver from southern China in 1911 at the age of 20, and had to pay a $500 head tax. He worked for a time as a houseboy then apprenticed himself to an English tailor to learn a trade and open his own shop. For his staff, Kung Lai imported "paper relatives" from China, bachelor tailors who would never have a chance to marry. His two eldest boys, Bill and Jack, born a year apart, did everything together. As toddlers, they were allowed to play with scraps of wool and spools of thread at the tailor shop. Later, they would go help out in the shop after attending English school, followed by Chinese school. The 1950s, when the brothers took over Modernize, were prosperous years, with some 20 tailor shops operating in Chinatown. The so-called zoot suit was introduced by jazz musicians in the U.S. in the 1940s and became wildly popular with young men in Vancouver a few years later. This louche style called for wide-legged, high-waisted trousers pegged at the ankles and long jackets with wide lapels and exaggerated shoulders. Modernize produced scores of such suits. They also made costumes for Vancouver's Theatre Under the Stars musical productions and for performances at the historic town of Barkerville in the B.C. interior. The popularity of the suit began to wane in the 1960s, under the influence of such blue-jean wearing film stars as Marlon Brando. A trend toward informality in office wear followed with the introduction of "casual Fridays." Mass manufacturing of clothing in Asia meant a flood of cheap off-the-rack clothing that had not previously existed.”

Wong - Lena and Kay - 1930s

Collector/curator's description reads: “C. 1930, Vancouver. Photo of two sisters: Lena Wong (left) and Kay Wong. They were the daughters of Quong John Wong, a businessman who ran a produce store and invested in several Vancouver Chinatown restaurants, including the famous W.K. Gardens Chop Suey restaurant on East Pender Street.”

Wong - Mow with sons - 1933

Collector/curator's description reads: “1933, Vancouver. Photo of shirt tailor Wong Mow (seated) and his son's by second wife: Wah Wong (left) and Git Wong. Wong Mow owned and operated the Modern Silk Shirt Company on Main Street in Vancouver's Chinatown.”

Wong - Quong John and wife with children - 1919

Collector/curator's description reads: “1919, Vancouver. Quong John Wong with his wife Hum Shee Wong and their children. Left to right: Mrs. Wong holding son Ted; Leonard (#1 son); Quong John Wong; and daughter Kathleen. Quong was a Vancouver businessman who ran a grocery store and invested in restaurants. It is believed that, for some period, he was a partner/owner in the W.K. Gardens Chop Suey restaurant, a popular banquet-style restaurant that operated in Vancouver's Chinatown from about 1917-1985.”

Chan - Mary Lee - 1948

Collector/curator’s description reads: “1948, Vancouver. Portrait of Mary Chan who was best known as a community activist in Vancouver's Chinatown and surrounding neigbhourhoods. She and her husband Walter founded SPOTA: the Strathcona Property Owners and Tenants Association. Along with her daughter Shirley, the Chan family organized the neighbourhood and stopped demolition and the building of a freeway through Vancouver's Chinatown.”

Chan - Walter - 1955

Collector/curator’s description reads: “1955, Vancouver. Head and shoulders portrait of Walter Wah Koh Chan. He was married to Strathcona community activist Mary Chan. Walter Chan was a leader in the fight to save Strathcona and Chinatown from urban renewal and the freeway. He wrote articles for the Chinese press rallying the Chinese community. Along with his wife, he made speeches and was one of the three initial Co-chairs of SPOTA. To earn a living, he worked as a Manager in Chinatown in the family store: Trans Nation Emporium which sold curio and antiques in the front (Pender Street side) and Chinese foods and herbal medicines in the back (Columbia Street). As Walter was educated and scholarly, he worked for the clan association Chin Wing Chun Tong as secretary treasurer. He wrote letters for illiterate members, he managed their books, he made speeches at gatherings etc. He had a chronic illness that was undiagnosed. He died 58. Hence, few people remember what he did for the community. His wife Mary Chan, carried on the community activism work for another 30 years.”

Fung Wai Man - late 1930s

Collector/curator’s description reads: “Late 1930s, Vancouver. Young unidentified Chinese woman, wearing a cheongsam, sitting on a piano stool. In the inscription, the woman identifies herself as Fung Wai Man. The inscription reads ‘Younger sister Wong Oy Wah, kindly accept. Gifted by Fung Wai Man.’ The photo was found in a collection of images stored at Ming Wo Cookware store in Vancouver's Chinatown.”

Kwan Grace

Collector/curator’s description reads: “1936, Vancouver. Hand-painted full length portrait of Grace Kwan, the Chinese Jubilee Queen. Photo was been taken outside the studio. Kwan was one of several jubilee queens crowned in the year that the City of Vancouver celebrated its 50th anniversary. Grace Kwan was 18-years-old when she was crowned Miss Chinese Jubilee Queen. It was 1936 and was celebrating its 50th birthday. Chinatown joined in the festivities by creating a fair ground complete with gates and pagoda. Grace was crowned local queen in a colourful ceremony at WK Gardens Chop Suey Restaurant. Later, she would go on to marry one of the owners of the WK Gardens, Harold Lim. She died at age 29.”

Lai - Tin Yew

Collector/curator’s description reads: “Mid-1940s, Vancouver. Full length studio portrait of Lai Tin Yew. Tin Yew originally worked in sawmills. But in the 1970s opened and ran the successful Yip Hong Yuen Bakery in the heart of Chinatown until his retirement in 1987.”

Lum - Tommy Ming

Collector/curator’s description reads: “Vancouver. Circa late 1920s. Ming (Tommy) Lum can to Canada in June 1922. He was a paper son: He posed as the son of his real-life brother. Consequently, Ming had to say he was younger than he really was. He was 18 when he arrived in Canada, but his head tax certificate recorded him as being only 13. He arrived in Canada in 1922 and on his Head Tax Certificate his name was recorded as Lim Joe Ming. Ming at first worked with his brother selling groceries from a horse and cart in Chinatown. In 1927 he opened Canada Produce. Ming died in 1987.”

Wong - Quong John - c.1915

Collector/curator’s description reads: “C. 1915, Vancouver. Quong John Wong in a suit. Quong was a Vancouver businessman who ran a grocery store and invested in restaurants. It is believed that, for some period, he was a partner/owner in the W.K. Gardens Chop Suey restaurant, a popular banquet-style restaurant that operated in Vancouver's Chinatown from about 1917-1985.”

Wong Boo Chow - c. 1920

Collector/curator’s description reads: “C. early 1920s, Vancouver. Photo of Wong Boo Chow. He arrived in 1912 and worked in the logging industry primarily on Vancouver Island. In 1923, the Chinese Exclusion Act became law and he lost hope that he could ever bring over his family over from China. By November of 1923, he arranged to marry a much younger, Canadian-born Chinese woman -- Mah Suey Hang, the daughter of a merchant from Cumberland Chinatown. After three children and a difficult marriage, their fight over custody of the children made newspaper headlines in 1931 in both Chinese and English-language papers. The Wong Benevolent Society came to Boo Chow's rescue and helped him finance his custody battle. In the end, Boo Chow managed to keep two of his children, his sons, with him in Canada. Although he more or less neglected them and the two boys grew up in boarding houses without much oversight.”

Wong Mow - 1941

Collector/curator’s description reads: “1941, Vancouver. Photo of tailor Wong Mow who ran the Modern Silk Shirt Company on Main Street in Vancouver's Chinatown. His actual name was Wong Quon Ho. And he was 20 years old when he arrived in Canada in 1911 on the Chicago Maru. He lived in the back of his shop on Main Street in Chinatown. He had a wife and one child in China. And here in Canada, with his second wife he fathered four children: Wah Wong; Git Wong; Larry Wong and Jennie Wong.

Lim - Herb Lim in uniform - 1944

Collector/curator’s description reads: “Circa 1944, Vancouver. Photo of Herb Lim in his Army uniform. Herb was recruited to join Force 136, the clandestine group of soldiers who were trained by the British and were destined to be dropped in behind Japanese lines in Southeast Asia. After the war, Herb became a businessman and owned a gas station as well as other businesses in and around Chinatown.”

Mah George Fook Yu - 1945

Collector/curator’s original description reads: “1945, Vancouver. Portrait of George Fook Yu Mah in uniform. The photo has been hand colourized. The handwritten inscription reads ‘To Mamie with love, George, 1945.’ George Fook Yu Mah was born in Vancouver on October 5, 1917. His family ran a Chinese grocery and dry goods store in Shanghai Alley in Vancouver’s Chinatown. During WWII, George signed up to support Canada’s work effort. He enlisted in the Army and the insignias indicate he was attached to the WWII 2nd Armoured Brigade Tank Division. Shortly after the war, in 1947, he married Mamie Mei Ching Wong. Together, the couple would have three children: Georgina, Geoffrey and Roxane. To support his family, George worked as a foreman at the Canadian Fishing Company in Prince Rupert, BC. He was described by his children as a fun-loving character who enjoyed socializing and having a good time with friends. He liked football games, cooking and eating good food! His children recall with fondness the day George returned home from a trip to Edmonton, Alberta. He proudly showed up at home driving a 1962 Oldsmobile 98. Unfortunately, George died young. On February 9, 1965, when he was only 47, he passed away from a brain hemorrhage.”

Con Winnie - late 1930s

Collector/curator’s description, reads: “Late 1930s, Vancouver. Photo of Winnie Con as a bridesmaid in the wedding of Edward Wong and Adeline Mah. Winnie would later marry Quon Wong, a businessman based in Vancouver's Chinatown.”

Lane - Leonard and Adeline - wedding - 1949

Collector/curator’s description reads: “October 1, 1949, Vancouver (518 Main Street). Wedding portrait of Leonard and Adeline Lane. Bio Leonard Lane: Leonard was a staff person in the BC Association for the Advancement of Coloured People. He was also one of the original members of the Unity Credit Union, which extended loans to members of the Black community. He was the Credit Union's treasurer for 8 of its 9 years. Lenora, the daughter, asked Adeline about her memories of Yucho Chow and the day the photo was taken. Adeline "...doesn't remember that much but she said my dad asked some other Black people in the community where they should go for pictures and Mr. Chow's name came up. They went to his studio to have the photos taken. A good guess would be that his studio was in Chinatown as the community around the AME church was not very far from there. My mom says he was very nice and made them feel comfortable and welcomed. She doesn't remember if he spoke good English but says it must have been pretty good as there was no problem understanding each other. She remembers when they got there he had them remove their coats and said Okay, let's get to it! She remembers someone showing them where and how to stand but whether it was Mr. Chow or someone else she doesn't know.’"

Sierpina - Walter and Mary - wedding - 1949

Collector/curator’s description reads: “November 12, 1949, Vancouver (518 Main Street). Photo taken 2 days after the sudden death of Yucho Chow. Photo likely taken by one of his sons. Wedding of Walter and Mary Sierpina. They were married at St. Casimir's Church at 27th and Fraser. But then came to Chinatown for their photos. L to R: Jean Berger; Zygmunt Joblonski, Ann Faye; John Kubat; Walter Sierpina; Mary (?) Sierpina; Violet Hopkins; Anton (last name not provided); and Kay Kozakiewicz.”

Sierpina - Walter and Mary - wedding - 1949

Collector/curator’s description reads: “November 12, 1949, Vancouver (518 Main Street). Photo taken 2 days after the sudden death of Yucho Chow. Photo likely taken by one of his sons. Wedding of Walter and Mary Sierpina. They were married at St. Casimir's Church at 27th and Fraser. But then came to Chinatown for their photos.”

Young Norman and Elsie - wedding - 1942

Collector/curator’s description reads: “1942, Vancouver. Wedding photo of Norman Young and Elise (Lim) Wong. Yung Woon Won (Norman Won Young) arrived in Canada in September 1923. He was one of the last to enter Canada as the Chinese Exclusion Act [Chinese Immigration Act, 1923] had gone into effect on July 1, 1923. A provision in [the] Act allowed people already in transit to enter Canada. Norman worked at the famous banquet restaurant in Vancouver's Chinatown called the W.K. Gardens.”

Artwork - 1934 - family tree

Collector/curator’s description reads: “1934. Artwork of Family Tree created by Yucho Chow. Top row: Yip Shee Quon (aka Mrs. Yucho Chow wife #2); Mrs. Yucho Chow (wife #1); Yucho Chow. Middle row (left to right): Jessie; Rose; Bick Lin; Mabel; Peter. Bottom row: Henry; Philip; Jack; Samuel.”

Chow, Yucho

Chinatown Business men - Larry Wong

Collector/curator’s description reads: “1920s, Vancouver. Photo of several men who were part of a Chinese business association. Wong Mow (owner Modern Silk Company; later called Modern Shirt Company) is second from left. Yucho Chow (studio photographer) is fifth from left.”

Chow Jack Kinn - 1927

Collector/curator’s description reads: “1927, Vancouver. Portrait of Jack Kinn Chow, the second Canadian-born son of photographer Yucho Chow. Jack would train as an optometrist and would open and operate his own optical shop in Chinatown.”

Jack Chow and Ying (Ng) Chow wedding - 1938

Collector/curator’s description reads: “October 28, 1938, Vancouver. Wedding photo of Jack and Ying (Ng) Chow taken on their wedding day. Jack was the second Canadian-born son of Yucho Chow and became one of the first Chinese optometrists. He owned and operated an optical store in Vancouver’s Chinatown for many years.”

Jack Chow - circa 1937

Collector/curator’s description reads: “1937, Vancouver. Portrait of Jack Kinn Chow, the second Canadian-born son of photographer Yucho Chow. Jack would become one of the first Chinese optometrists, and opened a store in Vancouver’s Chinatown which he operated for many years.”

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