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Archival description
Chinatown (Vancouver, B.C.) Centennial celebrations With digital objects
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1958 : A year to remember

Item is a film containing highlights of British Columbia's centennial year in Vancouver. Includes shots of an antique car parade, a tall ship at dock, naval vessels, street decorations in Vancouver, Chinese Freemasons parade (with drill team, dragon dance, etc.), a powwow, horse racing at Exhibition Park, PNE parade, and the last of the region's interurban streetcars. Film also includes footage showing the aftermath of the Second Narrows Bridge collapse.

Vancouver : a year in motion

Item is a videocassette containing interviews of photographers involved in a Vancouver Centennial comemmoration project.

In anticipation of the centennial year, Tom Sutherland and Cindy Bellamy worked with over fifty photographers to put together a photographic portrait book of Vancouver called “Vancouver: A Year in Motion”, intended to capture the face of the city at teh Centennial. Producer/director Craig Sawchuk followed and interviewed eight of the photographers for a documentary about the project.

The documentary follows Heather Dean, an aerial photographer, in a helicopter over Vancouver showing aerial views of the city including popular landmarks such as Canada Place, the Science Centre, BC Place, and the harbor. Sterling Ward spends some time photographing the development of the Expo 86 sites, a roller coaster, and some of the sculpture installations. Al Harvey takes candid shots at the beach during the polar bear swim and celebration on the first day on 1986. Colin Savage discusses remote control photography and swims with a dolphin and beluga whale at the Vancouver Aquarium with trainer Doug Pemberton. Albert Chin photographs a traditional Chinese lion ceremony for the opening of a new restaurant in Chinatown. Derik Murray was the official photographer of the Vancouver Canucks and the documentary follows him to a hockey game (Vancouver Canucks vs. Boston Bruins). Greg Athens does a photo shoot on Grouse Mountain with professional freestyle skier [Darryl Bowie]. Lloyd Sutton spends time on Granville Island photographing the local scenery, shops, and a glass blowing lesson/studio.

The documentary concludes with a scene of the photographers together going through the photos around a large table. The documentary is dedicated to Rick Hansen and concludes with footage of Hansen.

Sawchuk, Craig

Vancouver on the move

Item is a videocassette containing a documentary about the city of Vancouver.

The main focus of the documentary as a whole is the social and cultural life in the city and the relationship between the people and their surroundings in 1986, the centenary year. The visual elements are a combination of historical photographs, hand drawn illustrations, historical moving image footage, and moving image footage shot by the filmmakers between 1985 and 1986. Music with a narrator speaking in the foreground accompanies the visuals.

The early history of Vancouver is told through stories about George Vancouver naming point Grey and Burrard channel and meeting First Nations people, John Deighton (“Gassy Jack”) opening his saloon, the first city council meeting, and the arrival of the first CPR train from Montreal and ship from Yokohama.

The discussion of modern life in Vancouver that makes up the bulk of the documentary is roughly divided into sections. The first section discusses modern commerce, including shipping, transportation, forestry, fishing, and tourism. The second section discusses cultural life, including the natural beauty of Stanley Park, street scenes in Chinatown, the expo grounds and the SkyTrain, street musicians, children playing at a water park, and a football game at BC Place.

The third section focuses on the immigrant experience and how a diversity of cultures enriches life in the city. This point is illustrated with scenes of new Canadians at a citizenship ceremony, Tai Chi in Queen Elizabeth Park and Chinese dragons in Chinatown, the Nitobe Memorial Garden and the Powell Street Festival, a Sikh Wedding and street scenes of Main Street in South Vancouver. It also explores the dark side of the immigrant experience, discussing the 1907 race riots, the Japanese internment camps, the Komagata Maru incident, and the struggle of First Nations peoples to recover and retain their cultural heritage.

The fourth section deals with Vancouverites' love of being outside, with footage of outdoor aerobics and other fitness activities, relaxing on the beach and ‘being seen’, outdoor cocktail parties and dining, a family picnic in the park, outdoor theatre, and sailing.

Okexnon Films Inc.