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Archival description
City of Vancouver Archives sound recording and moving image collection Vancouver (B.C) Video
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Bicycle ride

Item is an amateur film which captures images of Vancouver in 1974 as the creator, Hans Sipma, rode his bicycle about the city. The ride begins near Semlin Dr. and 1st Ave. and proceeds north to Kitchener St., then turns left onto Garden Drive and continues to East Hastings. Some storefronts on East Hastings are briefly visible before the ride continues northbound on Nanaimo, with Crown Mountain and Mt. Fromme visible on the horizon. The ride proceeds north to Wall St., and then along Wall St. eastbound to the Second Narrows Bridge (now the Ironworkers Memorial Second Narrows Crossing).

Crossing into North Vancouver, the bike is directed westbound along Main, Cotton Dr., and Low Level Rd., where the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool substation is visible. The bike detours over the train tracks and onto Pier 94, capturing images of ships, cranes, and lumber piles before continuing west via Esplanade Ave., Forbes Ave., and 3rd St. to Marine Drive. The ride then captures stills westbound along Marine Drive, passing Pemberton Ave. and Capilano Rd. before crossing Lions Gate Bridge back into Vancouver.

From the bridge, Mr. Sipma ventured up on a trail to Prospect Point before proceeding southbound on Stanley Park Dr., then catching another trail down to Third Beach. Along the seawall numerous people are seen walking, and the downtown skyline grows nearer. He proceeds past Second Beach Pool and captures several stills of Englesea Lodge. As he travels down the Seaside Bicycle Route, the Burrard Street Bridge can be seen in the background.

He makes his way up Beach Ave. before carrying his bicycle up a set of concrete stairs to the surface of Burrard Street Bridge, where he dodges those walking on the sidewalk as he rides southbound. He pauses briefly at the intersection of Burrard and Cornwall before riding southeast toward Granville Island. As he continues along the Seaside Bicycle Route, a great deal of construction can be seen along the south side waterfront of False Creek. There are glimpses of the north shore of False Creek. Mr. Sipma emerges from the trail and heads east, pausing briefly at Cambie and 2nd Ave. before heading along 1st Ave. He heads north up Quebec St. He then turns to head back home, heading down Main St., and then 1st Ave. via Terminal Ave until he hits Victoria Dr., from which he turns homebound into an alley just as the film runs out. During his ride, Mr. Sipma captures gas prices, buses, cars, stores, signs, city skylines and buildings, clothing, and much more in 1974 Vancouver.

Ski-interview

Item is a video of an Chan-Chek TV Vancouver interview. The interviewed guest is the 1960 downhill skiing Olympic gold medal winner, Jean Vuarnet, and the interviewer is Bob Dawson, director of Mt. Seymour Ski School. Jean Vuarnet responds to a number of questions, and in his answers touches on subjects including the books he has authored on skiing; his hometown of Morzine, France, and the skiing area he was asked to help develop there; his gold medal win at the 1960 Squaw Valley (CA) Olympics and the "egg position" downhill ski technique; his training; his metallic skis; his opinion on particular Simpsons-Sears ski boots and bindings; the strength of the French skiing program; and skiing skill within his family.

The trading post

Item is a video of a Chan-Chek TV Vancouver television program titled "The Trading Post," with Ron Morrier. In the program, Ron Morrier sits at a desk reading letters and taking live phone calls for people interested in purchasing, selling, or trading goods (except for clothing, automobiles, or accommodations). Examples of the goods in question include rowing machines, electric guitars, tikis, stoker furnaces, televisions, purebred chihuahuas, water softeners, and bicycles.

Urban transportation

Item is a a video which consists of interviews representing various opinions on the 1970 report on the Greater Vancouver Area Rapid Transit Study and its recommendations. Those participating in interviews in this segment include Dr. Julius Kane, Department of Animal and Resource Ecology, University of British Columbia; Allan Kelly, Chairman of the Greater Vancouver Regional District; and Dennis O. Gorman of the Greater Vancouver Regional Planning Board. It is also possible that some of the voiceover responses to questions are those of Derrick Mallard (founder of the Society for Promoting Environmental Conservation) as he does not appear in the video but is credited on the slate.

In this video, Dr. Julius Kane expresses disappointment with the findings of the transit study report, and over the course of his interview explains why he would rather invest money in increased, toll-free bus service than capital development for rapid transit. Allan Kelly, on the other hand, explains what is meant by "rapid transit," why fees for transit should be paid by users, and why he believes rapid transit may be a good fit for Vancouver. Dennis Gordman is interviewed six months after the release of the report, and comments on how the perspective of the Greater Vancouver Regional Planning Board has changed in that time, and how the Board is approaching rapid transit in the Greater Vancouver Regional District.

Urban transportation : [excerpt]

Item is a segment of a video which consists of interviews representing various opinions on the 1970 report on the Greater Vancouver Area Rapid Transit Study and its recommendations. Those participating in interviews in this segment include Dr. Julius Kane, professor at the University of British Columbia and Allan Kelly, Chairman of the Greater Vancouver Regional District. It is also possible that some of the voice-overs are those of Derrick Mallard as he does not appear in the video but is credited in the full version.

In this particular excerpt, Dr. Julius Kane explains why he would rather invest money in increased, toll-free bus services than capital development for rapid transit. Allan Kelly, on the other hand, explains why fees for transit should be paid by users, and why he believes rapid transit may be a good fit for Vancouver. At some points the interviews become voice-overs for video snippets of traffic in Vancouver.